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We are located just twenty minutes from Honolulu and just eight miles from Mililani.

We are located just twenty minutes from Honolulu and just eight miles from Mililani.

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Nutrition and Eye Health

Nutrition is a vital part of maintaining vision and overall eye health, with many expert studies suggesting that up to 25% of all nutrient intake goes to supporting our invaluable visual system. Beyond your eyes, this system also includes the nerves, blood vessels and parts of the brain that help to obtain and interpret the images that we see. Excellent overall eye health also helps prevent potentially vision threatening eye conditions such as cataracts, macular degeneration and glaucoma, as well as minor conditions, such as dry eye.

Maintaining a balanced diet is an essential part of proper nutrition. Whole foods, including fruits, vegetables, seeds and nuts, are very important and will help the body to receive and absorb nutrients that play an essential part in eye and vision health. Intake of sweets and other junk foods should also be limited, since the body loses chromium and B vitamins as it attempts to process white sugar, and medications, preservatives and caffeine all deplete vitamins and minerals that are important for healthy eyes and vision.

Health experts have recommended specific foods that have proven to help keep your eyes healthy and your vision good. Dark leafy greens like spinach, kale and brussels sprouts, as well as dark berries like blueberries and blackberries can protect against serious illnesses such as macular degeneration, a very serious eye condition that is the leading cause of vision loss in people over the age of 60. Omega-3 fatty acids, which can be obtained from salmon and tuna, have proven to reduce inflammation in the blood vessels of the eyes, which, along with proper control of blood sugar can also protect against diabetic retinopathy. Wheat grass has also proven effective in the boosting of immune systems and reducing the chances of developing all diseases, including those that affect the eyes.

Unfortunately, not all of us have an easy time eating the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables every day. In this case, health professionals recommend incorporating at least one fruit or vegetable smoothie per day into your overall diet, which will allow you to get the required amount of greens per day in one easy meal or snack. Nutrients tend to absorb more quickly and effectively into the body in a liquid form, since the body does not have to work as hard to break it down.

Eating your way to good eye and visual health is easy with the right motivation and information. To learn more, contact your eye doctor today.

Family Eye Care

Accurate, friendly and comprehensive eye care is an essential part of maintaining the overall visual health of the entire family. Routine eye exams, screenings for eye diseases and proper development, and keeping up with constantly changing eyeglass and contact lens prescriptions all play a vital part in the long term visual health of every member of the family from youngest to oldest. Dr. Matsumoto is always aiming to help families live every day with their clearest, most comfortable vision possible.

Proper eye care for the whole family starts with routine eye exams. Among the most important reasons for children is the central role that proper vision plays in his or her initial, as well as ongoing, success in schoolwork and extra-curricular activities. Dr. Matsumoto explains, “The eyes are responsible for a great deal of our every day sensory experience. The eyes are, therefore, the main vehicle through which most of us learn. This is why it is so important to safeguard this incredibly valuable instrument of education and experience. Also important for children are eye exams focusing on the early detection and treatment of eye conditions like amblyopia and strabismus. These conditions can be treated very easily in early childhood, but become much more complicated if allowed to advance and develop into later childhood and adulthood.

For Mom and Dad, eyeglass and contact lens prescriptions are usually pretty stable and rarely, if ever, change. Unfortunately, this leads many adults to believe that comprehensive eye exams are only for their children, and that they no longer need routine check ups to maintain good vision health. However, in some respects it is even more important for Mom and Dad to have their annual check up than their children. This is because adults, especially those 40 years old and above, and those with underlying health issues such as diabetes, are at significantly increased risk of developing sight-threatening conditions, such as glaucoma, cataracts and macular degeneration. Proper routine check ups, with a focus on early detection of these and other potentially harmful eye conditions, should be considered an important part of every adult’s health regimen.

Our comprehensive family eye care includes all the most important tests and screenings to determine the overall eye health of you and your children, the whole family for corrective lenses, and make sure that the whole family sees comfortably and clearly for many years to come.

Come see us today to experience what makes Dr. Matsumoto the best eye doctor around!

All About Dry Eyes

Sometimes a person is unable to produce enough tears or their tears do not possess the right qualities to keep eyes healthy and comfortable. This can cause a consistent lack of sufficient lubrication and moisture on the surface of the eye, known as dry eyes.

Normally, the eye constantly lubricates itself with tears by producing them at a slow and steady rate, keeping itself moist and comfortable. Usually these tears consist of three layers, an oily, a watery, and a mucus layer. Each layer has a specific role in lubricating your eyes. The oily layer is outermost. It’s main purpose is to slow evaporation of the tear. The watery layer is in the middle. This makes up the majority of what a person normally thinks of as tears. This layer cleans the eye and helps to wash away small foreign objects and particles. The inner layer consists of mucus. This mucus allows the watery layer to stick to the eye and spread evenly over the eye in order to keep it lubricated. In a person with dry eyes, either hormonal changes, side effects from medication or some other factor causes the eye to either not produce enough tears, or leave out parts of the tear that make proper lubrication possible.

Dr. Matsumoto explains, “Symptoms of dry eyes include stinging or burning in the eyes, scratchiness, and excessive irritation from smoke or wind. Although it may sound counter-intuitive, the eyes’ response to the consistent irritation caused by dry eyes may also cause a person to experience excessive tearing. In this case, the eye is attempting to flush and lubricate itself by producing more tears, but is unable to do so successfully due to the rate of evaporation or inability to spread the tears properly.”

Although dry eyes are not always curable, your optometrist may prescribe artificial tears to help with some of the symptoms. Artificial tears are lubricating eye drops that may help with dry, scratchy feeling eyes. Different artificial tears work in different ways. Some help replenish parts of the tear that your eyes are not producing on its own, others help to produce more tears overall. Your eye doctor will assist you to choose which will help you most. Dr. Matsumoto cautions, however, “These artificial tears should not be confused with eye drops that are advertised to ‘get the red out.’ These eye drops may indeed reduce the appearance of redness in your eyes, but this is accomplished by making the blood vessels in your eyes smaller rather than actually lubricating your eyes. As such, these drops can sometimes actually make your symptoms worse. One should also be aware that if you wear contacts, some eye drops require you to take them out before using the drops and wait 15 minutes or more before reinserting your contact lenses.”

Some cases of dry eyes are seasonal, such as those which occur as a result of cold, dry winter air. In this case, your eye doctor may recommend wearing sunglasses or goggles when outdoors to reduce your eyes’ exposure to the sun, wind and dust. For indoors, your optometrist may recommend an air cleaner and humidifier to take dust out of the air and add moisture to air which is too dry.

Studies have also shown that nutrition may have a part in helping to relieve some symptoms of dry eyes. Your eye doctor may recommend nutritional supplements such as omega-3. Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids are cold-water fish, cod, herring and salmon, as well as flaxseed oil. Mild dehydration can make symptoms worse too, so be sure to drink plenty of water, 100 percent fruit and vegetable juices and milk.

For more information, and to have Dr. Matsumoto help you with your dry eyes, be sure to make an appointment with your eye doctor today.